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Imperfect

Cover of Imperfect

Imperfect

An Improbable Life
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"Honest, touching, and beautifully rendered . . . Far more than a book about baseball, it is a deeply felt story of triumph and failure, dreams and disappointments. Jim Abbott has hurled another gem."--Jonathan Eig, New York Times bestselling author of Luckiest Man

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

Born without a right hand, Jim Abbott dreamed of someday being a great athlete. Raised in Flint, Michigan, by parents who encouraged him to compete, Jim would become an ace pitcher for the University of Michigan. But his journey was only beginning: By twenty-one, he'd won the gold medal game at the 1988 Olympics and--without spending a day in the minor leagues--cracked the starting rotation of the California Angels. In 1991, he would finish third in the voting for the Cy Young Award. Two years later, he would don Yankee pinstripes and pitch one of the most dramatic no-hitters in major-league history.

In this honest and insightful book, Jim Abbott reveals the challenges he faced in becoming an elite pitcher, the insecurities he dealt with in a life spent as the different one, and the intense emotion generated by his encounters with disabled children from around the country. With a riveting pitch-by-pitch account of his no-hitter providing the ideal frame for his story, this unique athlete offers readers an extraordinary and unforgettable memoir.

"Compelling . . . [a] big-hearted memoir."--Los Angeles Times

"Inspirational."--The Philadelphia Inquirer

Includes an exclusive conversation between Jim Abbott and Tim Brown in the back of the book.

"Honest, touching, and beautifully rendered . . . Far more than a book about baseball, it is a deeply felt story of triumph and failure, dreams and disappointments. Jim Abbott has hurled another gem."--Jonathan Eig, New York Times bestselling author of Luckiest Man

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

Born without a right hand, Jim Abbott dreamed of someday being a great athlete. Raised in Flint, Michigan, by parents who encouraged him to compete, Jim would become an ace pitcher for the University of Michigan. But his journey was only beginning: By twenty-one, he'd won the gold medal game at the 1988 Olympics and--without spending a day in the minor leagues--cracked the starting rotation of the California Angels. In 1991, he would finish third in the voting for the Cy Young Award. Two years later, he would don Yankee pinstripes and pitch one of the most dramatic no-hitters in major-league history.

In this honest and insightful book, Jim Abbott reveals the challenges he faced in becoming an elite pitcher, the insecurities he dealt with in a life spent as the different one, and the intense emotion generated by his encounters with disabled children from around the country. With a riveting pitch-by-pitch account of his no-hitter providing the ideal frame for his story, this unique athlete offers readers an extraordinary and unforgettable memoir.

"Compelling . . . [a] big-hearted memoir."--Los Angeles Times

"Inspirational."--The Philadelphia Inquirer

Includes an exclusive conversation between Jim Abbott and Tim Brown in the back of the book.

Available formats-
  • Kindle Book
  • OverDrive Read
  • EPUB eBook
Languages:-
Copies-
  • Available:
    6
  • Library copies:
    6
Levels-
  • ATOS:
    6.9
  • Lexile:
  • Interest Level:
    MG+
  • Reading Level:
    5

Recommended for you


Excerpts-
  • Chapter 1

    I spent two baseball seasons in New York and enjoyed them most on Saturday mornings, when the city composed itself with a long, slow breath.

    Maybe it was a sigh.

    Either way, on this particular Saturday the sidewalks twenty-­seven floors below the apartment window were less cluttered, the taxi hailers appeared in a hurry but not altogether panic-­stricken, the dog walkers smiled and nodded at passersby as their little city pooches, pleased not to be rushed, did their morning business. Across 90th Street, a broad patch of emerald green--­conspicuously so against the old brick and brownstone and grit--­hosted a game of soccer, filling the neighborhood with cries of encouragement, whoops, and applause.

    The sky was gray, a leaden touch to a yawn-­and-­stretch morning on Manhattan's Upper East Side. The idle observations from the uniformed lobby doorman and the waitress four blocks away at Gracie's Corner, where the wait was manageable and the pancakes were reliably fluffy, were about afternoon rain, the prospect of which further softened the jostle of the expired workweek.

    I liked it there.

    Dana and I had carved something like a routine from our first year east. What began as an exercise in survival became almost comfortable. We'd rented a one-­bedroom apartment with a sofa, a coffee table, and a couple chairs, bought a few things for the kitchen, and mostly ate out. We were in our mid-­twenties, a good time for exploration and discovery and a semi-­furnished life. At first we walked the neighborhood within a few blocks of 90th and York Avenue, browsing the shops and studying the menus taped to the windows before widening the radius to include Central Park and the museums that run practically side-­by-­side along Fifth Avenue.

    We began to smile at familiar and friendly faces: the people with whom we regularly rode the elevator, the guy behind the deli counter a couple doors down, the woman who pushed quarters across the top of a stack of tabloids, change for our newspaper. Amid its swirling rhythms and every-­man-­for-­himself pretenses, New York was becoming a good place for us. We were learning about each other, fending for ourselves, accumulating the scrapes and bruises that come with the outsiders' clumsy entrance.

    I'm not sure the transplants among the city's millions ever believe that life there can be done quite right. There's simply too much one can't know, there being so many wonderful layers of people and cultures, so many siren blips and impulses. And yet, many find their spots. There is a life to be had in the spaces of stillness amid the commotion, and that's where we generally succeeded in hosting it.

    The job wasn't going as well.

    I walked with Dana that morning with The New York Times under my arm and work on my mind. A man pushed buckets of fresh flowers to the sidewalk, far enough to be tempting to passersby, not so far as to be out of sight. The paper carried the story of the Yankees' loss last night at The Stadium, a Cleveland Indians rookie named Manny Ramirez--­raised in New York's own Washington Heights--­hitting his first big-­league home run in front of scores of friends and relatives down the left-­field line, and, two innings later, his second. The Mets had lost in Chicago. The Angels game had gone too late to make the early edition. There may have been a mention of me somewhere within those pages, which I'd chosen not to read.

    It was early September and beginning to feel like it. The weather was turning and the Yankees were in the race, in second place, a couple games behind the Toronto Blue Jays in the American...

About the Author-
  • Jim Abbott was a major league pitcher with the Los Angeles Angels and the New York Yankees, among other teams. Born in 1967, he was an All-American at Michigan; won a gold medal with the 1988 Olympic baseball team; and threw a no-hitter at Yankee Stadium in 1993. He retired in 1999. Abbott has worked with the Department of Labor's Office of Disability Employment Policy, has been a guest pitching instructor for the Los Angeles Angels, and has appeared as a motivational speaker. He lives with his wife and two children in Anaheim.

    Tim Brown is an award-winning writer with twenty years of experience covering Major League Baseball at the Los Angeles Times, The Star-Ledger, Cincinnati Enquirer, and Los Angeles Daily News. He studied journalism at the University of Southern California and Cal State Northridge, and currently works for Yahoo! Sports.

Reviews-
  • Hall of Famer Cal Ripken, Jr. "Jim Abbott is the embodiment of perseverance. The obstacles that he was able to overcome to play the game at the highest level are remarkable and his story can teach all of us valuable lessons. Jim was a fierce competitor. He never viewed his disability as a disadvantage and, as a result, it wasn't. Imperfect is a terrific story and the best part is that it's true."
  • Don Mattingly, former New York Yankee captain and current Los Angeles Dodgers manager "As I read Imperfect: An Improbable Life, Jim Abbott's love for the game jumped off the pages. It was like Jim was right in front of me telling me his life's journey. I felt his pain, hurt, joy, exhilaration, disappointment and accomplishments throughout his life. Jim has always been and continues to be an inspiration for all of us."
  • Mark Kriegel, author of Pistol: The Life of Pete Maravich and Namath: A Biography "The story of Jim Abbott--wonderfully crafted by Tim Brown--is everything you'd expect from a baseball life: funny, heartbreaking, and triumphant, though not necessarily in that order. Still, to label this fine book 'an inspiration' almost misses the larger point. Imperfect isn't about learning to cope with a disability. It's about becoming a man in America."
  • Ian O'Connor, New York Times bestselling author of The Captain: The Journey of Derek Jeter and Arnie & Jack "Jim Abbott was 20--22 as a pitcher for the Yankees, and yet, as a man who played the game with one hand, an argument should be made that he belongs among the greatest players of all time. In Imperfect: An Improbable Life, Abbott and one of America's leading sports journalists, Tim Brown, tell the amazing story of a man's dignity and grace in overcoming a forbidding physical hurdle to pitch 10 big-league seasons and to throw a no-hitter. Abbott won every day he took the mound. This book is required inspirational reading for all fans of the human spirit."
  • Tom Verducci, senior writer for Sports Illustrated and New York Times bestselling co-author of The Yankee Years "If you think you knew the inspirational story of Jim Abbott, think again. With Tim Brown, Abbott gives an unflinching account of his remarkable baseball life--the joys and the pains. With each chapter you know him better and root even harder for him."
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    Random House Publishing Group
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