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Word Fugitives

Cover of Word Fugitives

Word Fugitives

In Pursuit of Wanted Words
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Despite the many thousands of dictionary words at our disposal, our language can be dismayingly inadequate. How many times have you searched for a word that means just what you want it to but failed to find anything suitable anywhere? Most of us, it turns out, lead lives rife with experiences, people, and things that have no names.

At least, they lacked names until now. Word Fugitives comes to the rescue, supplying hundreds of inspired words coined or redefined to meet everyday needs. For instance, wouldn't it be handy to have a word for the momentary confusion people experience when they hear a cell phone ringing and wonder whether it's theirs? (How about fauxcellarm, phonundrum, or pandephonium?)

Or what about a word for offspring who are adults? (Try unchildren or offsprung.) Or a word for the irrational fear when you're throwing a party that no one will show up? (That might be guestlessness, empty-fest syndrome, or fete-alism.)

This mind- and vocabulary-expanding book grew out -- way out -- of Barbara Wallraff's popular column in The Atlantic Monthly. Brimming with irresistible diversions and pop quizzes; illuminated by contributions and commentary from authors, linguists, and leading language authorities; and enlivened by pleas for help from people whose words have yet to be found, Word Fugitives will captivate and inspire anyone who ever struggles to describe the world that he or she, or they, or thon (thon? see page 141) lives in.

Despite the many thousands of dictionary words at our disposal, our language can be dismayingly inadequate. How many times have you searched for a word that means just what you want it to but failed to find anything suitable anywhere? Most of us, it turns out, lead lives rife with experiences, people, and things that have no names.

At least, they lacked names until now. Word Fugitives comes to the rescue, supplying hundreds of inspired words coined or redefined to meet everyday needs. For instance, wouldn't it be handy to have a word for the momentary confusion people experience when they hear a cell phone ringing and wonder whether it's theirs? (How about fauxcellarm, phonundrum, or pandephonium?)

Or what about a word for offspring who are adults? (Try unchildren or offsprung.) Or a word for the irrational fear when you're throwing a party that no one will show up? (That might be guestlessness, empty-fest syndrome, or fete-alism.)

This mind- and vocabulary-expanding book grew out -- way out -- of Barbara Wallraff's popular column in The Atlantic Monthly. Brimming with irresistible diversions and pop quizzes; illuminated by contributions and commentary from authors, linguists, and leading language authorities; and enlivened by pleas for help from people whose words have yet to be found, Word Fugitives will captivate and inspire anyone who ever struggles to describe the world that he or she, or they, or thon (thon? see page 141) lives in.

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Excerpts-
  • Chapter One

    Our Unruly Inner Lives

    disorganized — or at any rate, the English language is. Sometimes we have plenty of synonyms or near-synonyms to choose from — for instance, idea, concept, thought, inspiration, notion, surmise, theory, impression, perception, observation, mental picture. More specialized meanings get specialized words. If, say, you're looking for a word that can mean either "a phantom" or "an ideal" — why, eidolon stands ready to serve. And yet some fairly common things and phenomena remain nameless. For instance, what would you call the experience of having recently heard about something for the first time and then starting to notice it everywhere?

    That particular word fugitive (which you'll find captured and discussed shortly) is worthy of note, because once you're aware of it, if you begin rooting around in coined words, you'll find it popping up maybe not everywhere but certainly hither and yon. Essentially the same question is asked by the writer Lia Matera in the book In a Word; Matera suggests we call the experience toujours vu. Another book, Wanted Words 2, asks the question, too, and presents more than a dozen possible answers, including newbiquitous and coincidensity. Are toujours vu, newbiquitous, and coincidensity really words? No, not quite. They are the verbal equivalents of trees that fall soundlessly if no one is listening. They are Tinker Bell, whose little light will be extinguished if we don't believe in her. They are words only if we use them.

    See how unruly we've managed to get already?

    It's only going to get worse — especially if you didn't read the Introduction. We're about to delve into questions that people have posed and answers that others — kind, clever souls — have proposed, and there will be digressions along the way. If you find yourself wondering, What's up with that? turn back! You are worthy, of course, but not fully prepared for the journey ahead.

    "What's the word for that restless feeling that causes me to repeatedly peer into the refrigerator when I'm bored? There's nothing to do in there."
    Nick Fedoroff, Wilmington, N.C.
    Robert Clark, of Austin, Texas, is someone who knows this feeling. He wrote: "I often find myself revisiting the same refrigerator I left in disappointment only moments ago, as if this time the perfect snack — which I somehow managed to overlook before — will be there waiting for me. Almost invariably I find that I am suffering from a leftoveractive imagination."

    Cold comfort, refrigerator magnetism, smorgasboredom, and freonnui are all coinages that lots of people suggested. Other ideas include stirvation (Jon Craig, of Del Rey Oaks, Calif.) and procrastifrigeration (Jared Paventi, of Liverpool, N.Y.). A person in the relevant frame of mind, says Dick Bruno, of Hackensack, N.J., is bored chilly. And Chris Rooney, of San Francisco, wrote, "Back in my bachelor days, when I wasn't going out with someone that night I'd head to the fridge for some expiration dating."

    Then there were the brand-specific coinages, such as "the urge to play tag with the Maytag" (Marcel Couturier, of Nashua, N.H.); Frigistaire (Bob Segal, of Chicago, among others); and the upscale Sub-Zero interest (Daniel Markovitz, of New York City).

    But these are getting much too fancy, don't you think?

About the Author-
  • Barbara Wallraff is a contributing editor at The Atlantic Monthly, where she has worked since 1983. Doing justice to the English language has long been a professional specialty of hers. She has written for the New York Times Magazine's “On Language” column, she is a former commissioner of the Word Police, and National Public Radio's Morning Edition once asked her to copyedit the U.S. Constitution. Her name appears in a Trivial Pursuit question -- but not in the answer. Wallraff is the author of the national best seller Word Court and Your Own Words. She lives in Brookline, Massachusetts.

Reviews-
  • Boston Globe

    Wallraff picks her way through language thickets with a sure step and a generous attitude.

  • Francine Prose, author of A Changed Man and Blue Angel

    "Barbara Wallraff proves herself to be a wise, witty, and marvelously entertaining guide through the jungle of English usage."

  • James Fallows, National Magazine Award-winning correspondent for The Atlantic Monthly

    "There is a discovery and a smile on every page."

  • Patricia T. O'Conner, author of Woe Is I: The Grammarphobe's Guide to Better English in Plain English

    "No fugitive word, however crafty or devious, can escape the clutches of that peerless lexical sleuth Barbara Wallraff."

  • Charles C. Mann, author of 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus

    "This book should carry a warning sign...it contains several hundred seriously twisted puns."

  • Merl Reagle, Sunday Crossword Puzzle Creator, The Los Angeles Times

    "Read it alone. It might be embarassing to chortle so much in public."

  • Steven Pinker, Professor, Harvard University, and author of The Language Instinct, Words and Rules, and How the Mind Works.

    "A delightful book on an entertaining and fascinating topic: how we coin words."

  • Kirkus Reviews

    ...an up-to-date guide to usage that can be both pleasurably browsed and quickly consulted...

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